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36th Pennsylvania Infantry (7th Reserve)
Company D

 

 

Company D of the 36th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (7th Reserve) was from Clinton County. They were also known as the Lock Haven Rifle Guards. I hope to eventually add more information about Clinton County in the Civil War, as well as other regimental information about the 36th. My Gottshall family line is from this area, and my great-great grandfather, Samuel Gottshall, served in this unit. The 36th (7th) was part of the Army of the Potomac, and was involved in a number of battles, including Antietam and Fredericksburg. The unit also took part in the Wilderness Campaign.

 

Please note that my information on other companies in this regiment is limited, but I'll do what I can to help with your research on the 36th. Additional information is always welcome!

 

 


 
Civil War Veterans Marching in Parade, Lock Haven, PA

 

/////This site contains the complete roll and a history of Company D of the 36th Pennsylvania Volunteers (7th Reserve).

/////The image at the top of the page is the regimental flag of the 36th. Richard Sauers, author of Advance the Colors: Pennsylvania Civil War Battle Flags, writes:

/////During the Civil War, flags played an important part on every battlefield. They were the heart and soul of every regiment, and were protected at a staggering cost in flesh and blood. A tangible reminder of the federal government, the bullet-ridden and torn silk banners were a source of immense pride to the men in blue.

/////In battle, the flags were a rallying point when the regiment became disorganized. A usual command was for the men to close on the colors. When the advance faltered, the colonel would order "Advance the colors" to inspire the men to follow their sacred flags. A large percentage of the Medals of Honor were awarded for actions involving flags.

/////The reason that this and some other regiments were designated by two numbers (in this case the 36th and 7th) is that some regiments were part of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. Sauers writes:

/////The "Reserve Volunteer Corps of the Commonwealth" was created by one of the legislative acts signed into law by Governor Curtin on May 15, 1861. Curtin was fearful of the possible dire consequences of the shortage in the Pennsylvania militia caused by the mustering of twenty-five regiments into federal service. Since Pennsyvlania bordered on a state of dubious loyalty, the Governor influenced the Legislature to authorize the raising and equipping, at state expense, of a force to consist of thirteen regiments of infantry, one of cavalry, and one of artillery, for defense of the Commonwealth. The men were to be enrolled for a period of three years, but if needed, the corps would be placed at the disposal of the federal government.

/////Accordingly, camps were established in Harrisburg, Pittsburgh, Easton, and West Chester, as the corps would represent all sections of the Commonwealth. Brigadier-General George A. McCall was placed in command of the corps, and it did not take long for the regiments to recruit more than enough men. Although the Reserves were numbered as "line" regiments, they were better known by their more popular "Reserve" designations. The thirteen infantry regiments, numberd 30th through 42nd, were known as the1st through the 13th Reserves, and thus each regiment had two numbers. For example, the 32nd Pennsylvania was also known as the 3rd Pennsylvania Reserves. The artillery regiment, numbered 43rd, was better known as the 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery, and the cavalry regiment, the 44th, as the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry.

 

Regimental History

/(From Clinton County in the War of the Rebellion)

/////There was but one company (D) in this regiment from Clinton County; however, we give a brief sketch of the regiment, extracted from "History of Pennsylvania Volunteers," by Samuel P. Bates.

The companies composing the Seventh Reserve were recruited in several counties lying east of the Allegheny Mountains, rendezvoused at Camp Wayne, near West Chester, early in June, 1861, and were organized June 26th with the following field-officers: Colonel, Elisha B. Harvey, of Wilkesbarre; Lieutenant-Colonel, Joseph Totten, of Mechanicsburg; Major, Chauncey A. Lyman, of Lock Haven.

July 21, 1861, the Seventh was ordered to Washington via Harrisburg and Baltimore. Before starting it was supplied with forty rounds of ammunition per man, and before passing through Baltimore they left the cars and loaded their muskets, and thus prepared for any emergency that might present itself.

/////On its arrival in Washington the regiment went into camp at Meridian Hill, and July 27, 1861, was mustered into the United States service by Maj. Elwood, after which the arms received from the State of Pennsylvania were exchanged for muskets from the Washington Arsenal.

/////Aug. 2, 1861, the regiment broke camp and marched to Tenallytown, the point of general rendezvous of the Pennsylvania Reserves. The division was soon after organized, and the Seventh was assigned to the Second Brigade, commanded by Gen. George G. Meade. Here was performed the first picket duty, and here too the smooth-bore muskets of the right and left companies were exchanged for Springfield rifles.

/////August 24th the regiment was ordered to march to Great Falls, on the Potomac, where it remained two weeks. September 4th, while here, it encountered the enemy, who came down on them upon the opposite shore, and opened fire from a battery of five guns, two howitzers and three rifled pieces, and a brisk fire of shot and shell was kept up for three hours.

/October 9th the Seventh, together with the division, broke camp, and moved to near Langley, Va., and formed the extreme right of the Army of the Potomac. In this camp the regiment remained inactive during the winter of 1861-62, but the time was spent in preparing for future and more brilliant operations.

/////March 10, 1862, the Seventh, with the rest of the division, broke camp and moved to Hunter's Mills. The men were here supplied with shelter tents, which they continued to use during the remainder of the war. The regiment broke camp, and in the midst of a deluge of rain the men marched to Alexandria, and here the Seventh was assigned to the First Army Corps under Gen. DcDowell. The Seventh, however, went into camp at Fairfax Station, where it remained four weeks. April 9, 1862, it moved with the division to Manassas Junction, where it went into camp. On the 17th of April it marched to Catlett's Station, and May 11th to Falmouth. June 9th the regiment embared on transports and went to White House, on the Pamunkey River, thence along the line of the West Point Railroad to the front. Halting within six miles of Richmond, on the left bank of the Chickahominy, the division was placed on the extreme right of the Army of the Potomac, and attached to the Fifth corps under Gen. Fitz John Porter.

/////June 26th the enemy was encountered by the "Bucktails" near Mechanicsville. By direction of Gen. McCall the Seventh was posted on the left of the line. During an engagement that followed the Seventh held the left of the line, near the open ground stretching out to the Chickahominy. Its position was several times changed during the engagement, and entirely separated from the division. The regiment was taken to the left of the line, where it assisted in repulsing a charge of the enemy, and again changed to the centre, where it performed a similar act in reinforcing Butterfield's brigade.

[Vi P. Limric writes:]

/////The afternoon of the 27th they fought at the battle of Gaines' Mill and after 3 charges suffered a loss of almost half of their members as wounded or slain.

/////After the Seven Days' fight had ended, and the smoke of battle cleared away, only two hundred out of that full-ranked, well-disciplined body of men who embarked upon the Rappahannock less than a month before were fit for duty.

/////July 4, 1862, Col. Harvey resigned, and Lieut.-Col. Bolinger was promoted colonel. Several promotions were made among the line-officers, and several meritorious non-commissioned officers were promoted to be lieutenants. On the 31st the camp was shelled by the enemy, and soon after the Seventh, under command of Lieut.-Col. Henderson, marched with the brigade to dislodge them and protect the camp and shipping from further annoyance.

[Vi P. Limric writes:]

/////...during which they crossed the James [river] and cut down the forest and burned the buildings of Edmund Ruffin who sheltered the enemy with the hopes of destroying Union transports and stores collected on the shore of the river at Berkeley Landing.

/////The purpose of the expedition was accomplished on the 15th of August, when the brigade was relieved and embarked for Acquia Landing, which place it reached on the 17th, and marched to Kelly's Ford, on the Rappahannock. This movement united the Reserves, now commanded by Gen. Reynolds, with the Army of Northern Virginia under Gen. Pope.

[Vi P. Limric writes:]

/////...[the regiment] took part in the battle of Second Bull Run on the 29th & 30th, losing badly.

/////At the close of Pope's campaign the Seventh went into camp at Munson's Hill, where it remained till September 7th, when with the Army of the Potomac it went to Meridian Hill, encamping upon the same ground that it did in 1861.

/////Two days later the regiment marched through Maryland to Frederick City, and to the foot of South Mountain, where it met the enemy's skirmish line, and soon met the enemy in force, drove him up the rugged mountain-side, and just at the summit a rebel soldier turned and deliberately fired at Col. Bolinger, who was in the front urging on his men, the ball entering and tearing the flesh of his right arm, passing through his right breast, inflicting a dangerous wound. The command then devolved upon Maj. Lyman.

/////The regiment participated in the battle of Antietam, on the 16th and 17th of September, and October 3d the division was reviewed by the President, and on the 12th the Seventh was detailed as a part of a force sent out to meet the rebel cavalry on its raid under Stuart. On the 26th it moved by way of Berlin across the Potomac to Warrenton, arriving November 6th and was immediately placed upon the picket line. The regiment remained in camp here until the 16th, when it moved with Burnside in the direction of Fredericksburg, and after three days' march encamped at Belle Plain.

/////The regiment participated in the eventful battle of Fredericksburg, where the old Seventh added new laurels to its already shining crown. In Gen. Meade's report of the battle he says, "The Seventh engaged the enemy to the left, capturing many prisoners and a standard, driving them from their rifle-pits and defenses, and continuing the pursuit till, encountering the enemy's reinforcements, they were in turn driven back."

/////December 15th, the Seventh, with the rest of the army, recrossed the river and went into camp at Belle Plain. Nothing of interest occurred during the winter other than the historic "mud march."

/////Feb. 8, 1863, the Reserves were, by order of the War Department, transferred from active service in the field to duty in the Department of Washington. Embarking at Belle Plain February 7th, the regiment proceeded to Alexandria, and on the 11th marched to Upton's Hill, where it remained in camp till April 14th, and was then for a time on duty at Camp Convalescent.

/////June 18th it returned to Alexandria, and was assigned to duty in the command of Gen. Slough. Various changes took place here, amongh which Maj. Lyman became Lieutenant-colonel. During the summer and fall of 1863 the regiment remained at Alexandria.

/////In the latter part of April, 1864, the regiment was directed to prepare again for active operations in the field, and on the 18th the boys again took up the line of march to join the grand army through the Wilderness. It halted several days at Manassas, and was attached to the Fifth Corps, under Gen. Warren. May 2d the Seventh broke camp and advanced along the Rapidan, and encamped at night near the Chancellorsville battle-ground, the Reserves occupying the centre of the line. On the following morning, quite early, the line was advanced about three miles, when the regiment, through no fault of its officers, was led into a skillfully-laid ambuscade, from which it was useless to try to escape, and two-hundred and seventy-two officers and men were captured and immediately marched to the rear of the rebel army at Orange Court-House, and thence to Lynchburg, Va. The enlisted men were speedily sent tot he rebel prison-pens at Andersonville, while the officers were sent to Macon, and subsequently placed under fire of our guns at Charleston, for the protection of the city. The cruelties inflicted upon our men in these rebel hells were too horrible to relate at this time. The surviving members of the regiment were mustered out at Philadelphia, June 16, 1864.
 

Roll of Company D

(from Samuel Bates' History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers)

Webmaster's Note: I have tried to keep all the abbreviations the same as they appear in the primary document.

COMMISSIONED

Chauncey A. Lyman, capt; April 24, 1861; pro. To maj. June 26, 1861; to Lieut.-col June, 1863.

Henry C. Bolinger, capt.; April 24, 1861; pro. To capt. June 26, 1861; to Lieut.-col. May 5, 1862; to col. July, 1862.

Jesse Merrill, capt.; April 24, 1861; pro. To 1st lieut. June 26, 1861; to capt. May 9, 1862; trans. To Signal Corps Sept. 12, 1863.

George B. Danahay, capt.; April 24, 1861; pro. to 2d lieut. Dec. 7, 1861; to 1st lieut. May 9, 1862; to capt. Sept. 12, 1863; to bvt. maj. March 13, 1865; disch. March 25, 1865.

John S. Haynes, 1st lieut; April 24, 1861; pro. to 1st sergt Jan. 1, 1862; to 2d lieut. May 9, 1862; to 1st lieut. Sept. 12, 1863; must. out with company June 16, 1864

William W. White, 2d lieut.; April 24, 1861; pro. from private to 2d lieut June 20, 1861; to capt. Co. G Nov. 11, 1861.

NON-COMMISSIONED

George W. Fritz, 1st sergt.; April 20, 1861; rpo. from private to 1st sergt. Feb 1, 1864; to 2d lieut, Sept. 12, 1863; not mustered; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; vet.

William M. Butters, sergt.; April 29, 1861; pro. to sergt. July 27, 1861; wounded at battle of Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862; must. out with company June 16, 1864.

M. S. Frederick, sergt.; April 24, 1861; prisoner May 5, 1864; disch. Feb. 25, 1865.

William T. Bathurst, sergt.; April 24, 1861; pro. to sergt. Nov.4, 1863; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; vet.

Reuben W. Shell, sergt.; April 24, 1861; pro. to sergt. Nov. 6, 1863; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; vet.

Clemson J. Castello, sergt.; April 21, 1861; pro. to sergt. June 26, 1861; killed at Fredericksberg Dec. 13, 1862.

Abram R. Kitchen, sergt.; April 24, 1861; pro. to sergt.; died of wounds received at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862.

Michael S. Eckert, corp.; April 20, 1861; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps Oct. 7, 1863.

Orange Holmes, corp.; July 16, 1861; absent, sick, at must. out of company.

Samuel Doan, corp.; July 23, 1861; absent, sick, at must. out of company.

William C. Brown, corp.; May 20, 1861; disch. by surgeon Nov. 14, 1862.

Richard Hammersly, corp.; May 20, 1861; disch. for wounds received Oct. 3, 1862.

James L. Hastings, corp.; April 24, 1861; pro. to sergt.-maj. May 3, 1863.

John C. Stover, corp.; April 22, 1861; pro. to com.-sergt. Oct. 1, 1862.

Wilson P. Burnell, corp.; April 24, 1861; pro. t corp. Feb. 5, 1864; missing at Wilderness May 5, 1864; vet.

Frank H. Jobson, corp.; April 24, 1861; pro. to corp. Nov. 6, 1863; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; vet.

Beneville Shell, corp.; April 24, 1861; pro. to corp. Nov. 4, 1863; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

John H. Moon, corp.; April 24, 1861; pro. to corp. Nov. 17, 1863; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Thomas Hussleton, corp.; April 24, 1861; pro. to corp. Feb. 15, 1864; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Joseph M. Canfield, musician; July 23, 1861; must. out with company June 11, 1864.

PRIVATES

Amos T. Bisel, April 24, 1861; trans. to navy Feb. 16, 1862.

James Brooks, Jr., May 23, 1861; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps Oct. 9, 1863.

Andrew Bottorf, May 23, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. May 28, 1862.

Henry Becker, May 20, 1861; trans. to 100th P.V. May 31, 1864; veteran.

George W. Brown, July 16, 1861; pro. to q.m.-sergt. Oct. 1, 1862.

William Baner, May 20, 1861; missing at Wilderness May 5, 1864.

Alexander Bain, May 20, 1861; missing at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Joseph Brothers, May 20, 1861; died of wounds received at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862.

Andrew J. Borwn, July 16, 1861; trans. to navy Feb. 16, 1862; died at Cairo, Ill., date nknown.

Josiah Candor, April 24, 1861; must out with company June 16, 1864.

Charles W. Consor, April 24, 1861; disch. by surg. Oct. 24, 1862.

John Cohan, April 24, 1861; disch. by surg. Dec. 4, 1862.

John A. Cogley, April 24, 1861; pro. to q.m.-sergt. June 26, 1861.

Allen Crippen, April 24, 1861; missing at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Uriah Clark, April 24, 1861; missing at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Patrick Cook, May 20, 1861; prisoner May 5, 1864; dishc. Jan. 23, 1865.

James L. Crider, April 24, 1861; missing at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Daniel Clark, April 30, 1861; killed at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862.

Roland Clark, July 16, 1861; killed at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862.

Abner L. Crosby, April 20, 1861.

Daniel W. Doyle, May 20, 1861; trans. to 100th P.V. May 31, 1864; veteran.

Oscar Davenport, May 20, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Joseph Duly, April 24, 1861; killed at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862.

Christopher H. Faunce, April 24, 1861; disch. by general court-martial.

Michael J. Fought, April 24, 1861; killed at South Mountain Sept. 14, 1862.

Samuel Gottshall, April 24, 1861; disch. by surg. certif. Jan. 19, 1863.

James Gottshall, Aug. 17, 1861; trans. to 100th P.V. May 31, 1864.

Charles J. Green, May 27, 1861; prisoner May 5, 1864; disch. Jun. 23, 1865.

Frederick Green, June 1, 1861.

James A. Hunt, April 24, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. March 15, 1863.

John Huling, July 16, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Nov. 1862.

Michael Harford, July 21, 1861; trans. to 100th P.V. May 31, 1864; vet.

Jacob Hibler, July 10, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; vet.

Aug. B. Hathaway, April 24, 1861; died of wounds received at Bull Run Aug. 30, 1862.

Milo F. Hills, July 16, 1861; died in Baltimore Aug. 13, 1862.

Henry R. Jacoby, April 24, 1861; disch. by surgeon Aug. 12, 1862.

Andrew O. Jordan, May 20, 1861; disch. Nov. 5, 1863, for accidental wounds.

George Kinley, July 10, 1861; wounded in action; disch. by surgeon.

Williamson Kinley, April 24, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Willard Logue, July 16, 1861; must. out with company Jne 16, 1864.

William L. Locust, May 20, 1861; trans. to 100th P.V. May 31, 1864; veteran.

John T. Logue, Feb. 1, 1864; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864.

Adam Leslie, May 28, 1861; killed at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862.

Joseph B. Marshall, May 20, 1861; disch. Dec. 11, 1862, for wounds received in action.

Tim. J. Murphy, may 20, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Dec. 30, 1862.

Joseph W. McGee, July 16, 1861; prisoner from May 5, 1864, to Feb. 28, 1865; disch. Sept. 22, 1865; veteran.

William F. Marshall, July 10, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Samuel Mahan, Aug. 24, 1861; died at Georgetown, D.C., Oct. 20, 1862; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery.

Joseph Nagle, July 10, 1861; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps Oct. 9, 1863.

Richard B. Newberry, April 24, 1861; disch. on surg. Certif. March 31, 1863.

Robert W. Nolder, May 20, 1861; died March 25, 1864, of wounds received at 2d Bull Run; buried at Alexandria, grave 1614.

Oscar Owens, April 24, 1861; killed at Gaines' Mill June 27, 1862.

Thomas T. Peck, July 26, 1861; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps.

John Potter, April 24, 1861; trans. to Battery C, 5th U.S. Art., Nov. 11, 1862.

Augustus C. Price, April 24, 1861; prisoner May 5, 1864; disch. May 11, 1865.

George M. Pfoutz, May 20, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864.

John T. Ross, April 24, 1861; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps.

Cummings R. Ross, Sept. 10, 1861; pro. to com.-sergt. Nov. 28, 1861.

Elias W. Rothrock, April 10, 1861; killed at Antietam Sept. 17, 1862.

Matthew Roach, May 24, 1861; accidentally killed Sept. 9, 1861.

Matthias Reed, April 24, 1861; trans. to navy Feb. 16, 1862; died at Cairo, Ill.

F.G. Shanabrook, April 24, 1861; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps March 16, 1864.

Jefferson Sauser, April 24, 1861; trans. to Batt. A, 1st Pa. Art., April 3, 1862.

Wesley P. Shaver, July 10, 1861; must. out with company June 16, 1864.

Henry H. Springle, April 24, 1861; disch. for wounds received in action.

Ezekiel Smithers, July 16, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. July 10, 1862.

Charles M. Stout, July 27, 1861; pro. to 2d lieut. Co. E Aug. 1, 1862.

James Sheridan, May 20, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran.

Joseph Shaffer, April 24, 1861; prisoner from May 5, 1864, to Feb. 26, 1865; disch. June 29, 1865; veteran.

Simon Stone, July 10, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5 1864; veteran.

John B. Shannon, Aug. 24, 1861; missing in action at Wilderness May 5, 1864.

Rob. Summerson, May 20, 1861; died in Washington Jan. 3, 1863; buried in Military Asylum Cemetery.

David Summerson, May 20, 1861; died of wounds recieved at Bull Run Aug. 30, 1862.

Alfred Summerson, May 23, 1861; died at Camp Wayne, Va., June 17, 1861.

Joseph Wilson, May 20, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Oct. 16, 1862.

Oliver Whitesell, April 24, 1861; disch. Feb. 7, 1862, for wounds received in action.

William Walker, April 24, 1861; disch. on surg. certif. Jan. 28, 1863.

Arthur Wightman, July 10, 1861; disch. by order of War Department Nov. 3, 1861.

Albin White, July 10, 1861; trans. to Co. G Nov. 30, 1861.

Thomas Winters, April 24, 1861; died of wounds received at Charles City Cross-Roads June 30, 1862.

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Bibliography

  • Bates, Samuel P. History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-5. Wilmington, NC: Broadfoot, 1993.
  • Sauers, Richard A. Advance the Colors!: Pennsylvania Civil War Battle Flags. Vol. 1. Harrisburg, PA: Capitol Preservation Comm, 1991.

Regimental flag image courtesy of Capitol Preservation Committee, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

 


 

 

 
                                                

 

 

 
 

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